Blogs and Short Articles

Roy Pollock and Andy Jefferson, June 10, 2015

In baseball, a player’s batting average is the number of base hits per times at bat. The higher your batting average, the more valuable you are. In learning and development, your “batting average” is how often you improve performance per training initiative. The higher your batting average, the more valuable you are. . .

Roy Pollock and Andy Jefferson, June 10, 2015

Intravenous (IV) fluids are life-saving in many medical and surgical situations. But the line is only useful if it remains patent—if the fluids can actually get into the patient.  A kink, a clot, or other kind of blockage renders them useless. The same is true for your leadership development programs.  Leadership is the lifeblood of any organization..  Read more...

Andy Jefferson and Roy Pollock, February 27, 2015

When we wrote the Field Guide to the 6Ds we asked learning leaders to to provide case examples of the principles in action.  Each author was asked to summarize his or her “lessons learned” in a few bullet points of advice to other learning professionals. Here are a number of our favorites.  Read more...

Roy Pollock and Andy Jefferson, February 10, 2015

Most training and development professionals are motivated by a genuine desire to help people, teams, and businesses succeed. So, when we get the call that says, “I need a training program …” our natural tendency is to say, “Great, we will get right on it.” As it turns out, however, that is not the best thing to do.  Read more...


Andy Jefferson and Roy Pollock, February 1, 2015

Prescribing without diagnosing is medical malpractice. Is there an equivalent in our profession — a sort of training malpractice? We think there is.  It’s anytime that we fulfill a request for training without taking the time to be sure it is the proper therapy. When we do that, we run the risk of applying the wrong intervention (training) to a performance problem.   Read more ....


Learning Transfer: Come to Las Vegas and Stop Gambling 
Andy Jefferson and Roy Pollock, November 12, 2014

Training without a well-conceived learning transfer strategy is a gamble. Obtaining results from training requires more than just good instruction; it also requires a process approach for ensuring learning transfer. Without learning transfer, there are no positive training results. Read more...


Andy Jefferson and Roy Pollock, July 8, 2014

The 70:20:10 concept makes intuitive sense. Most of what employees learn, they learn on-the-job during the course of doing their work—that is where they spend most of their time. A smaller percentage comes from mentoring or stretch assignments, and the smallest fraction comes from formal training, since that is where they spend the least time. Read more...


Roy Pollock and Andy Jefferson, June 16, 2014

The reality is that training “events” don’t work. As learning professionals, it’s time we stopped delivering training events and started delivering performance improvement processes that have learning as a key component. As Linda Hudson, CEO of BAE Systems US Army, said in an interview in The Wall Street Journal, “You don’t go to a class and next week, everything changes.” Read more ...


Roy Pollock, October 23, 2013

In Gary Larson’s famous cartoon, a student asks his teacher if he can be excused because his brain is full. It’s funny as a cartoon, but it is tragic, wasteful, and all-too-common in corporate training. Read more...



Stop Wasting Your Time on Scrap! 
Andy Jefferson and Roy Pollock, April 8, 2013

Nothing is more discouraging than to invest a great deal of time and effort to create something and then see it go to waste because it is never used. And yet that happens to learning professionals every day. Estimates vary, but the consensus is that somewhere between 50% and 85% of training is never utilized in a way that actually improves performance. Read more ...


Roy Pollock, March 13, 2013

Recent articles have once again raised the question of how much corporate training actually adds value, and how much just goes to waste—something for which we coined the term “learning scrap” to draw the analogy to manufacturing scrap.  Both kinds of scrap waste time, materials, and opportunity; both undermine a company’s competitiveness. Read more ...